Large noodles - Oelenberg Abbey pasta
  • Large noodles - Oelenberg Abbey pasta
  • Alsace fresh egg pasta

Large noodles - Oelenberg Abbey pasta

€5.35

(€10.70 / Kilo)

Tax included
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The Cistercian monks of the abbey of Oelenberg - Alsace FRANCE - offer you the fruit of their work.

Pasta, pasta ... yes, but do it at the monastery and with lots of fresh eggs from the chickens.

More than a tradition, an artisan's craft that masters can still practice.

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Wide noodles


Supplier: Our Lady of Oelenberg


Ingredients: Wheat flour, prepared with 9 egg yolks and 2 egg whites per kilo of flour, ie 12% yolk and 5% white per kilo of flour, water, salt. Colorant-free in accordance with regulations.


Average nutritional value per 100g


Energy (kJ) / (kcal): 1219/289
Fat (g): 4.4
of which saturated fatty acids (g): 1.22
Carbohydrates (g): 52
of which sugars (g): 1.2
Protein (g): 9.2
Salt (g): 0.02



Net Weight: 500g


Made in France


Nine centuries of monastic life, ensured successively by Canons Regular of Saint Augustine, Jesuits and Trappist Cistercians since 1825.


A place steeped in history

For more than nine centuries, Oelenberg Abbey, the only survivor of the many men's monasteries that once existed in the country, has maintained the great monastic tradition in Alsace. Located on one of the last hills of the Sundgau, 15 km west of Mulhouse, the abbey shared the joys and misfortunes of this region.

In 1046, Heilwige de Dabo, Countess of Eguisheim, mother of Pope Leo IX, founded on the hill (Berg), along a stream (Oelen), a priory of canons regular of Saint Augustine, probably for the repose of the soul of his son Gérard, tragically dead during a quarrel with the Count de Ribeaupierre. Leo IX consecrated the church in 1049 and placed there relics of Saint Roman, martyr. Very prosperous in the 13th century, the monastery was ruined by wars in the 14th century. Its decline was accentuated until the 16th century. In 1626, the abbey passed to the Jesuit college of Freiburg im Breisgau, then to the university of that same city in 1774. During the Revolution, the abbey buildings were sold to a Mulhouse industrialist. Sold in 1821 to a priest, the former monastery then became a boarding school for young girls.

In 1825 he returned to the hands of a large group of Cistercian monks commonly called "Trappists", returning from exile. They came from Darfeld, Westphalia, where they had found a temporary refuge after many wanderings. A community of Trappistine sisters joined them and remained there until 1895 when they moved to Ergersheim, not far from Strasbourg (Notre-Dame d'Altbronn abbey); from there they will move much later to Bernardvillé (since 2009: Notre-Dame de Baumgarten abbey).

 

The monks put the agricultural domain into operation. They experienced difficult times: famine in 1846, fires, epidemics. Yet the prosperity of the monastery will continue to grow. Intense activity reigned there. Besides the farm and the mill, there was a brewery, a cheese factory, a bakery, a printing house; almost all trades were represented there. Dom Ephrem Van der Meulen, abbot from 1850 to 1884, built up a rich library. Oelenberg founded a monastery in Germany, in the diocese of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1862: Mariawald, near Heimbach. At the start of the 20th century, the abbey had 200 monks: 80 priests and 120 lay brothers. Oelenberg was then a very famous religious, intellectual and economic center.

The 1st world war was going to destroy all this development: the buildings were bombed and the monks had to disperse. Reconstruction was difficult. A group of monks of German origin went to live in Austria in 1925, at Our Lady of Engelszell, between Passau and Linz, on the banks of the Danube. They brought this ancient secularized Cistercian abbey back to life. Oelenberg suffered a second destruction in 1944-45, as important as the previous one. The diocese of Strasbourg and its faithful generously contributed to the reconstruction, while monks from Zundert (the Netherlands) came to support the very tried community which regained life and hope. A new stage then opened.
 

NLARG500

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5 /5

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Marie-Françoise D. published the 26/01/2021 following an order made on 08/01/2021

5/5

Délicieux.

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